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PostPosted: Sun 23 May 2004, 5:28 pm 
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As above, could someone write a step by step on doing the rear wheel bearings please? It's been asked for a couple of times lately, just want an FAQ.

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Last edited by CowboyDan on Mon 14 Mar 2005, 11:45 am, edited 3 times in total.

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PostPosted: Sun 30 May 2004, 12:25 pm 
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*clears throat* Ahhhh herm

Step 1: Jack up rear of car

Step 2: Remove rear wheels

Step 3: You are now looking at 2 rear drums. The cap in the middle, remove it, some like to remove it with a set of multigrips, or you can remove it with a screwdriver and a hammer. Once that is off, wipe all the excess grease off with a rag. Remove the split pin, and the cage. Now remove the retaining nut. Remove the drum. NOTE: It may need to be hit on the FRONT to loosen the shoes from the sides.

Step 4: There is 2 rear wheel bearings on each side. Remove them from the drum, they will just be able to be taken out, both front and rear. Open up your box of rear wheel bearings. You will notice that the new bearings are sitting in cones. These cones are NOT just there so the bearing does not get damaged in the packet and to be disgareded as ive seen people do before. Look inside the drum where the wheel bearings go, with the shaft of the hub runs. See the cones in the drum? They need to be hit out. With a punch, and a fairly big hammer. NOTE: some cones can be really stuck in, and need a really good bash to get them out. AVIOD hitting the housing of the drum with your punch. You want to aim only for the cone, if you damage the old cone, it does not matter, as you got the new ones in the packet! Of course you will clean all the grease out of the centre of the drum before you go hitting the cones out, this simply makes it a cleaner task, and you can see indents for the punch so the cones can be hit out. Hit both front and rear cones out of the drum.

Step 5: With the cones hit out of the drum, Just wipe over the area again, making sure its all clean. Get the new cones, and put them in the drum, you will notice they are an interferance fit, and will need to be hit in. Just *start* the cone by tapping it in square, once it is started, get the old cone that you just hit out, and use that to hit the new cone in. NOTE: You CAN hit the cones in backwards, and ive seen it done. Think where the bearing sits, and you cannot get it wrong. Its possible to get it wrong, but very difficult. More often than not, Once the new cone is in the drum, the old cone in which you used to hit in will just fall out. And your left with the new cone perfectly in place. Do this for both the front and rear cones.

Step 6: Ok, its time to take the new rear wheel bearings out of their little bags and pack them with grease. You need to use a type of High temprature wheel bearing grease. This stuff is cheap, and you can buy it from anywhere, including most petrol stations. If you have a wheel bearing grease packer, use it and you ready to install the wheel bearings, if not, read on. Put a small amount of grease in your hand, and start rubbing the wheel bearing into the grease, not back and forth, only one way, and you should notice the grease coming out the other side of the bearing. This is when they are 'packed'. Do this all around the bearing until it is filled with grease.

Step 7: Ok, so now you have got new cones in your drum, your wheel bearings are packed and ready to roll (pardon the pun). Install the rear REAR wheel bearing in the drum, and install the drum back onto the car. Install the front rear wheel bearing and washer, locknut, NEW split pin, cage, and drum cap. Roll the wheel around a few times to make sure its all smooth and you havent done anything wrong, and hey presto your done. New rear wheel bearings.

Something a mechanic will charge around $200, that most people can do themselves. A rear wheel bearing set will cost around $50. Grease about $5. Allow around 2 hours. Its a good fun, non stressful job. So if you've got noisey rear wheel bearings, consider doing it yourself rather than taking it straight to the mechanic and hurting your back pocket.

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PostPosted: Sun 30 May 2004, 12:54 pm 
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Wow that was an awesome write up. If some one adds some pictures it would be perfect.
Thanks Steve!


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PostPosted: Sun 30 May 2004, 6:09 pm 
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Nice one Steve, will move this to the FAQ's soon ;)

Thanks,

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PostPosted: Mon 31 May 2004, 8:54 pm 
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u wont be able to get the drum cover off if u have the handbrake on (linings will be pushed hard against it) so take it off the hand brake when rear of vehicle is in the air.
i just thought i should point out the obvious, nice write up

Jon


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PostPosted: Mon 07 Jun 2004, 12:23 pm 
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one problem i did this yesterday and the tightness of the nut holding the drum on was causing a problem
the wheel had movement
is there a torqe setting for this how do u know if u have it right

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PostPosted: Thu 24 Jun 2004, 3:35 pm 
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Torque for the hub nut is quoted as "20nm -> 0nm -> 5nm." I'm no mechanic though, I've only never seen one torque setting... not three. Does that mean "tighten to 20nm, undo, then tighten to 5nm"?

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PostPosted: Sat 16 Oct 2004, 8:43 pm 
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That means, do it up tight, to 'squeeze' the bearings into place, back the nut right off, and then do 5nm. Which is really light torque.

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